Grief and Loss

Greif & Loss


Losing someone close to you may leave you feeling sad, lost, alone, or even angry. You may miss the person who has died—you want him or her back. You might have also been so busy with caregiving that it now seems you have nothing to do. This can add to your feelings of loss. This is all part of mourning, a normal reaction to the loss of someone you’ve cared for.

There are many ways to grieve and to learn to accept loss. Try not to ignore your grief. Support may be available until you can manage your grief on your own. It is especially important to get help with your loss if you feel overwhelmed or very depressed by it.

Family and compassionate friends can be a great support. They are grieving, too, and some people find that sharing memories is one way to help each other. Feel free to share stories about the one who is gone. Sometimes people hesitate to bring up the loss or mention the dead person’s name because they worry this can be hurtful. But, people may find it helpful to talk directly about their loss. You are all coping with the death of someone you cared for.

Clayton Behavioral Therapist who treat grief & loss in adults

Clayton Behavioral Therapists who treat grief & loss in children and adolescents

Share by: